Hoosick Falls II

Yes, my Polaroid binge continues. I think it’s the physical involvement with the Polaroid process that draws me in. I get to participate in the image making in a different way than when shooting digital. Because it’s a large folding camera, and the film packets are also large, taking photographs is slower and more deliberate. With the increasing expense and rarity of the film there is less tendency to snap away as I might with digital. Each photo creates a unique object (the print) and also a negative which can be used to make a much different interpretation of the subject than the print. It’s a somewhat haphazard process in that focus, exposure and framing can’t be tightly controlled. It allows for the photographers fingerprints to get onto the images, quite literally in some cases. I like the chemical goop, messy, dust and pollen speckled, less than perfect results. B&W images, scanned from the paper negatives, look like they could have been shot in the 19th century. But the image quality suits the subject and the rendering I am looking for. The images become sketch like, capturing gesture and mood, while the process has its own language, something that can’t be reproduced in an honest way with digital.

I took another bike ride through Hoosick Falls to have a look at some of the old neighborhoods. These rural towns are authentic, they’re not prospering, being far from a large urban area, but they are rooted in place. The local history can be traced in the architecture and neighborhoods strung along the rail line and Hoosic River.

Anyway, another day at the softball complex in Hoosick Falls, NY. Heavy clouds threatened rain all day, but it held off until after the final game, then came down hard. The Dalton girls 10U team made it to the championship game. The game was tied at the bottom of the 7th inning, but they gave up a run and lost 7-6. Great game and all the girls played very well.

2_img066-a-Edit

1_img065-a-Edit

3_img066-Edit

1_img068-a-Edit

2_img068-Edit

3_img069-Edit

Images photographed with a Polaroid 250 camera on Fuji FP-100C & FP-3000B instant films.